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kscott12

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  • in reply to: Old family friend experiencing homelessness #312
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    kscott12
    Participant

    Thank you for sharing this experience. I have thought about what I would do in a similar situation as I too work at a homeless shelter. I feel what you are describing is common practice not only to people we know before they become clients, but also clients we grow to know on a deeper level as we have worked with them for a long time. We are in positions where we are able to provide things for clients to make them more comfortable, in this case I feel it is not unethical. Where it becomes an issue is when clients or other staff feel people have favorites and then do more for one client than another. Then I feel it would become unethical. If you are doing you job which is partly making someone’s stay as comfortable as possible that is client centered, and it will look different to each client. If you can justify your reasoning to provide that service for the client, then do it. In the end another pillow is not a safety risk, and does not cause harm.

    What I feel is unique to this case is that you could provide a critical perspective to the notes that are written about Carol. Are they being written from a privilege standpoint and not taking context into consideration? You are in a unique position to think critically and practice reflection in your work with Carol and the other staff. Taking a step back like you did above shows that you thinking ethically and critically about your work, which shows that you care about being equitable in your work.

    in reply to: Growing up with Mental Illness in the Foster Care System #306
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    kscott12
    Participant

    Question 1: I feel Katie should seek the assistance of adult programs that could be a support for peter and help in his transition. Katie can continue to advocate and work with Peter to set goals and guidelines in how peter can achieve these goals. Katie could also look into second stage housing options within Phoenix and Shelter Nova Scotia. Katie could also look into MOSH housing first, and MOSH street health team to have a continuous support for Peter when Katie can no longer work with him. There are also options within Phoenix employability and learning centre that Katie can set up for Peter and they can continue helping peter with forms.

    Question 2: Structural barriers that affect peter are mental health and addictions stigmas, lack of mental health and trauma services, poverty, and a lack of transitional systems for youth leaving the foster care system.

    Question 3: I have already mentioned in question 1, alternative resources that could be available to peter that Katie could look into for him so he can have a better transition out of the system. Another resources could be setting up a trustee to help budget, setting up food banks, and finding a housing program that could work with peter long term.

    Question 4: The challenges peter is facing are both individual and systemic issues. His mental health should have more services offered by the system, the lack of transition is no fault of peters and is an system issue. Peter’s trauma is not his fault and he used unhealthy coping mechanisms to help because of the lack of services available to him.

    Question 5: Katie should continue to help Peter fill out his rental applications until she no longer can. Rental history is a barrier for lots of folks trying to obtain new housing. Having references from other professionals, and a trustee in place could help mitigate the issue of his poor rental history.

    Thank you for sharing, I feel this example is great to show the relationship between the individual and system issues, as well as how the system can fail.

    in reply to: Question of Power #293
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    kscott12
    Participant

    This is a really good ethical question. I feel it could be useful in this case is questions what CNBI states for the definition of independence. Does that definition come directly from Tanya, Emily, or a combination of the two? Tanya has an ethical obligation to protect the safety of her client. In saying so, I do not believe she should use that to make choices for her client that ultimately affect their life. I feel Tanya should make the decisions about transportation and mobility with her client. Having the conversation about what Emily wants in regards to the risk of having early onset alzheimer’s and what independence means to her. During that conversation, Tanya should keep her ethical obligations of safety and follow her agency’s mandate in check.

    I think this example is transferable to many areas of social work practice. As a social worker we need to follow our ethical guidelines set for us by our registry bodies, but also follow our mandates of the agencies we work for. I feel there is a balancing act we sometimes have to do. This is happening in this case. Until it comes a point where Emily cannot make decisions about herself, the decisions that will directly impact the life of the client should be a mutual decision.

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